Provincial Heritage Properties

Clockmaker's Inn

Clockmaker's Inn

Built by Rufus Curry in 1894. Rufus Curry moved to Windsor in 1888 from Avondale where he and his father built and operated a shipping fleet. He was one of the organizers of Wm. Curry & Sons which was a woodworking factory at Curry's Corner. He also helped in the establishment of the Windsor Electric Light Company. The Currys Corner area of Windsor is supposedly named for him. The house is an example of the Second Empire style with Queen Anne influences. It is a three storey dwelling of wood construction with a steeply pitched mansard roof with one central projecting tower. It has a symmetrical three bay facade with a centered doorway, numerous dormers with an overhanging gable roof with semi-circular windows and many decorative features.

Convocation Hall

Convocation Hall

King's College School was founded in 1788 and a year later the province passed an Act establishing King's College. Largely through bequests the college came into possession of a fine library of 18th century books and also through gifts by Thomas Beamish Akins, one of the most important collections of incunabula (books published before 1501) on the North American continent in the 19th century. In 1858 the Alumni Association of King's College proposed the construction of a convocation hall and library. With the backing of Sir William Fenwick Williams, hero of the siege of Kars in the Crimean War and lieutenant governor of the province, plans proceeded for its construction. The architect chosen was David Sterling and the contractor George Lang. Work began in 1861 and the building was officially opened two years later, but construction problems caused delays and it was not completed until 1867. Convocation Hall is a large sandstone building, originally constructed as a library between 1861 and 1867, in a Gothic Revival Style. The Gothic Revival detailing of this building is typical of ecclesiastical architecture of the period; largely inspired by medieval English parish churches. These details include: the wall buttresses, the large windows dominating the elevation and the parapet wall emphasizing the profile of the roof peak. An exception to these Gothic rules is the round headed design of the windows, though they are set within slightly pointed architraves.

Clifton House/Haliburton House

Clifton House/Haliburton House

Thomas Chandler Haliburton, author, lawyer, politician and judge, was born in Windsor, Hants County, in 1796. The only son of William and Lucy Haliburton, Thomas was a third generation Nova Scotian who is best known for his creation of the infamous Yankee peddler Sam Slick. In fact, Haliburton is generally considered to be the first Canadian author to have gained international recognition and some of his character's more clever sayings, such as "barking up the wrong tree" and "quick as a wink", have survived to find their way into every day twentieth century usage. In January of 1833, Haliburton purchased a forty acre lot of land located on Ferry Hill over looking the town of Windsor and surrounding area. He named the estate "Clifton" after the home of his wife near Bristol, England, and about 1836 erected a relatively small, one-and-a-half story, wooden Italianate villa on the site.

Sangster Inn

Sangster Inn

In 1800 John Sangster, believed to have come a decade earlier from Scotland, purchased a number of farm lots overlooking the ferry crossing for the road from the Windsor side through to Horton. Later in the same year Sangster received a license to keep a "House of Entertainment for the accommodation of travelers". Whether this house was on the site before Sangster purchased his lots or he had it build is unknown, but the reference is certainly to what became known as Sangster Inn. The Sangster Inn is a large two and one half storey, wood frame building with a gable roof and large central fireplace. The front elevation is five bays wide with a central entrance, which in turn incorporates an entrance porch, sidelights and fanlight. Besides the entrance the main exterior decorative element is the corner board detailing, with finely moulded capitals. The original windows have been replaced, though the actual window openings remain unaltered. Evident exterior features support a late 18th century date of construction.

Richmond Hill Farm

Richmond Hill Farm

Richmond Hill Farm is a large 2½ storey, wood frame structure with a truncated gable roof, sitting on a stone foundation. During its history, the building has been subjected to several additions, all subsequently removed, and alterations. The existing structure demonstrates both early 19th century and late Victorian architectural details. The narrow gable dormer is an example of the former, the front bay windows of the latter. Throughout the house are several suggestions, but no clear evidence, that the structure was built in more than one stage. The best estimate is that the house was erected by Francis Singer sometime in the 1820's.

St. John the Evangelist Roman Catholic Church

St. John the Evangelist Roman Catholic Church<

The St. John the Evangelist Roman Catholic Church was built in 1898. The Church and glebe house are one of only two buildings in Windsor designed by prominent Maritime architect, William Critchlow Harris.